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Trey Songz: Tremaine

Jordan Suber

Trey Songz is an R&B genius. His name is synonymous with hit maker and R&B legend. The R&B artist goes by many names: Trigger, Mr. Steal Your Girl, and simply Tremaine. Trey Songz is most notably known for his songs “Between the Sheets” and “In the Mood”.  The R&B singer branched off into acting later on, starring in the 2013 movie “Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3D,” which serves as a direct sequel to the 1973 version of “Texas Chainsaw Massacre”. Trey has just wrapped production for a movie to be released later this year titled “Brother’s Blood”.

Announced last December, Trey Songz’ highly anticipated seventh studio album has finally arrived. This album is a follow up to his mixtape released back in January titled “Anticipation 3.” Released on March 24th, “Tremaine” is a 15-track album that begins with the song “The Prelude.” In the song Trey sings about how he had so many girls and how they only want sex from him and how he misses the one good girl he had and goes on to sing about rebound girls, while also wishing that the girl he misses would pull up. The second song, “Come Over,” is about Trey wanting some girl to come over and do what adults do. The third and my personal favorite song is “#1 Fan,” which I can relate to because everyone is the number 1 fan of the person who currently has our eye. In my opinion the number 1 isn’t necessarily an actual fan but the woman whom he wants to be with.

In conclusion, this album is another great album from the R&B singer. This album lives up to the hype and has plenty of hot singles for the bedroom. If you are looking for an album to put your significant other in the mood, look no further. Trey has a bright future in front of him, whether it be singing or acting. The multi-talented singer has created yet another classic album and this one ranks amongst his top 3. I would definitely give this album a listen if you have not already.

Album Reviews 0

Sammy Arriaga: Meet in the Middle

Jimmy Sears

Latin and country are supposedly two very different genres, but that didn’t stop Sammy Arriaga from releasing his EP, “Meet in the Middle,” which combines both genres. While one would be skeptical, when I looked at “Meet in the Middle’s” genre, I was pleasantly surprised. Though Arriaga doesn’t bend his genre too much to where the country label is moot, it pushes the envelope to where, while it is a different sounding country album, it still maintains that distinctive flare. One could probably call this “alternative country” because of its infusion of Latin rhythms and country. Seven years went into the making of this album, and with the amount of time and effort put into the EP’s six tracks, one can only expect a sauntering wind of patterns that could freshen the air in the countryside.

“Meet in the Middle” begins with “Santana,” which quickly seeps in with an airy moisture that turns into an oasis. The drums have a slower beat while the guitars have a shuffle that’s red hot. The drums also have a laid-back pitch that makes for an excellent combination. The next track, “Tell ‘Em Why,” is opposite to “Santana.” Light, breezy and pacifying, the piano serves as the centerpiece and brings it down a tone for a sweet-sounding trail despite the theme of blame, with Arriaga accusing his girl of lies. A highlight for the EP is “Banjos and Bongos,” which, while a banjo and bongo are probably un unlikely couple to create a song (Much like Latin and country), both make for a clever usage that expresses a comradery despite the province-wide distance between Arriaga and his girl to create what is possibly the most fun track on the EP, not to discredit the other tracks. That being said, Arriaga successfully combines Latin and country for an all-around fun EP.

Album Reviews 0

GROMz: Two and a Half Days

Joel McRae

Hailing from Dunedin, New Zealand, up and coming indie surf-rock outfit GROMz has recently blessed the world with their debut release, “Two and Half Days.” Recorded in only two and a half days in a Port Chalmers studio, the eccentric four-piece band is quickly gaining traction with their well-received and highly praised debut, rapidly landing them in the Top 10 of Spotify’s International Viral charts. Having no record label, distribution network, or even a manager, GROMz has become yet another example that success can be achieved through the power of the internet alone.

Self-classified as a combination of salt-rock and grom-pop, GROMz’ music transcends genres as the band refuses to be pigeonholed by putting forth a variety of different sounds in “Two and a Half Days.” The EP kicks off with stand-out song “Mixed up and Confused”, a glamorous ode to heartbreak, youthful abandon, and young romance. The track flows directly into follow-up song “Glued to Her I-Phone”; a steady, guitar-driven journey into the sublime about finding love in another who appears too preoccupied with themselves to notice. 19-year-old lead singer and guitarist Semisi Maiai keeps his heart on his sleeve throughout the EP, meticulously piecing together mindful lyrics that undoubtedly have struck a chord with younger generations meandering through the aimless depths of adolescent love. With a successful debut like this one, it goes without question that GROMz has a bright and fruitful future ahead of them.

Album Reviews 0

GoldLink: At What Cost

Landen Winkles

GoldLink’s flow and beats are truly the word vibe in definition. Mixing hip-hop and soul into a well blended project, the result is his new project. He has such a unique vibe to his sound that it’s almost impossible not to get into his music. Finally, “At What Cost” dropped, and I’ve been nonstop listening to it. It’s my favorite project by GoldLink so far in his career.

“At What Cost” has the typical sound that GoldLink always has, made up mostly of unique, upbeat beats with the added touch of a few bangers as well as some great features. The album’s key features include Ciscero, Kokayi, Jazmine Sullivan, the amazing producer KAYTRANADA, Hare Squead, April George, Brent Faiyaz, Mya, Shy Glizzy, Lil Dude, and The Internet’s Steve Lacy.

There are so many songs I could talk about here, but I’m going to start off with “Herside Story”, featuring Hare Squead. When I saw that GoldLink rapped over “Herside Story” on his album, I was thrilled. I loved Hare Squead’s original version, and I liked GoldLink’s even more. It’s such a feel good track that I could replay it over and over. The chorus has such a catchy melody, and the verses flow so well.

The next song that stuck out was “Roll Call” featuring Mya. Again, it follows GoldLink’s style of being upbeat and groovy. Mya adds much to the song with her fantastic voice and unbelievably catchy hook. The song is all about not forgetting where you came from. GoldLink is blowing up, but he still hasn’t forgotten where he’s from. I could listen to this song on repeat, to be honest.

The last song I want to touch on is “Kokamoe Freestyle”. I haven’t heard a rap song with such a unique beat all year. It’s a funky beat which perfectly complements GoldLink’s tone. It’s a harder hitting song than the rest of the album, which I appreciate. Even though I love the groovy feel that GoldLink always displays on his projects, it’s nice to mix it up with a harder hitting song. “Kokamoe Freestyle” does just that.

GoldLink’s new album is a breath of fresh air in the hip-hop community and truly adds another solid project to GoldLink’s already phenomenal discography.

Uncategorized Comments Off on Jay Som: Everybody Works

Jay Som: Everybody Works

Landen Winkles

Virtuous though it may be, patience is a difficult quality to capture in guitar rock, a medium that much prefers boldness, concision, and urgency. Perhaps that’s why Bay Area multi-instrumentalist Melina Duterte’s reverence for the human capacity to wait, think and grow comes across as a revelation on “Everybody Works,” her first official album as Jay Som. “Take time to figure it out,” she advises on lead single, “The Bus Song.” In its context, she’s caught between relationship statuses, assuring the object of her fixation that she’ll “be the one who sticks around.” As an introduction to an album full of reminders not to rush things, though, the line is enough of a relief to make you involuntarily exhale.

Twenty-two-year-old Duterte made the fuzzy, dreamy, plaintive aesthetic her own on “Turn Into,” nine self-recorded tracks she uploaded to Bandcamp on a tipsy whim over a year ago. She later re-released with Polyvinyl in late 2016, billing the makeshift debut as a collection of “finished and unfinished songs” rather than a proper album. Although she made “Everybody Works” alone in her bedroom studio, its repertoire ranges from folk to funk to chart pop. It’s not a bedroom-pop album because it sounds a certain way, but because it feels so intimate. Most of Duterte’s elaborate songs could be mistaken for full-band compositions, yet her preference for writing and recording in solitude imbues each one with an introspective quality.

She’s ready for a change in pop music, and there’s no better indicator that a songwriter has found her voice than the ability to explore new styles and still sound like the same artist. Just a few years into her adult life, and only one album into her recording career, Melina Duterte has swept past a milestone many musicians never even get in their sights.